How to do a domain health check?

Building an Active Directory Health Check Tool [In-Depth]: Part II

Domain management used to consist primarily of selecting and registering a domain that reflects the organization’s name, and then protecting it. This may still be the case for small organizations, but it has already become more complicated for large organizations.

For large organizations around the world, domain strategies can range from registering domains and managing subdomains, name variants and campaign domains, to regional domains and defence registrations. The size of an organization’s domain portfolio is growing. The number of organizations with 250 to 500 domains has almost doubled from 9% in 2019 to 17% in 2020. Similarly, the number of organizations with 501 to 1,000 domains increased to 14% in 2020, compared to 8% in 2019.

Domain management and security has become of prime importance even more now and hence the need to check your domain’s health even more. With this article, we will tell you how to check your domain’s health. So, sit tight and take down the pointers.

1. Check your network connection

In many cases, if you open a web browser to access the URL and the URL fails to retrieve the web page, you will need to use DNS. In fact, the problem is likely due to a network connection. This is especially true if you are using a wireless network on your laptop. With wireless security protocols, when signal strength is lost, keys are sometimes renegotiated and network connectivity is lost. Of course, any type of network can lose network connectivity. In other words, before blaming DNS for your problems, start by troubleshooting “OSI Layer 1 – Physical” and then connect to your network. Here you should find a wireless connection with a valid Internet connection.

 Make sure your network has a valid IP address. You can check this by going to the Status view at the top of the page and in the Details section you can find your IP address and the IP address of your DNS server.

2. Make sure the domain controllers are synchronizing and copying continues.

The repadmin /replsummary command lists the replication status of all domain controllers to all domains in the forest. You will also know when DC was recently restarted and why it was discontinued.

3. Ensure that all trusted services are running smoothly.

There are four system components necessary for the effective functioning of Active Directory domain services: 1) DFS Replication, 2) DNS Server, 3) Intersite Messaging, 4) Kerberos Key Distribution Center. Verify that these components are working properly by running the following command:

$Services = ‘DNS’, ‘DFS Replication’, ‘Intersite Messaging’, ‘Kerberos Key Distribution Center’, ‘NetLogon’, ‘Active Directory Domain Services’

ForEach ($ Service to $ Services) { Get-Service $ Service | object name, select state }

Below is an example of the output after running this command. Note that we also looked at the case of NetLogon and Active Directory domain services (provided by NTDS) in general. The case example here shows that all services are running.

4. Use the domain controlled diagnostic tool (DCDiag) to explore all the aspects of a domain controller

DCDiag can be used by IT admins to test many aspects of domain controllers, including DNS. DNS errors can lead to replication failure. DCDiag’s DNS implementations allow IT admins to monitor the status of DNS forwarders, DNS delegations, and DNS record registrations. Here is the command that you can run:

DCDiag/test: DNS/e/v

5. Check your network connection

In many cases, if you open a web browser to access the URL and the URL fails to retrieve the web page, you will need to use DNS. In fact, the problem is likely due to a network connection. This is especially true if you are using a wireless network on your laptop. With wireless security protocols, when signal strength is lost, keys are sometimes renegotiated and network connectivity is lost. Of course, any type of network can lose network connectivity. In other words, before blaming DNS for your problems, start by troubleshooting “OSI Layer 1 – Physical” and then connect to your network. Here you should find a wireless connection with a valid Internet connection.

 Make sure your network has a valid IP address. You can check this by going to the Status view at the top of the page and in the Details section you can find your IP address and the IP address of your DNS server.

6. DNS extension resolution

If you are looking for a local host on a member DNS server on your PC, you may find that the DNS extension is useful for connecting to hosts and not using a fully qualified DNS name (FQDN). For example, if you connect to “server1”, your DNS server may have multiple inputs for that DNS name. The network adapter must be configured with a specific connection using the DNS extension. Each time you enter a DNS name like server1, the DNS extension is added to the end, resulting in server1.wiredbraincoffee.com. You need to make sure that the DNS suffix is ​​correct.

Conclusion

Keeping a check of your domain’s health is every business’ responsibility and hence it becomes essential to do these checks monthly or even weekly. If you have enjoyed reading this article, please share this with your colleagues and in case there are any questions or doubts, please put them in the comments section below.

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